#DNC2016 Day 1: United Together

Welcome to day one of the Democratic National Convention! Are you fired up? Are you ready to go? We sure are. Bright and early this morning, hundreds were lining up for the first day of the DNC 2016. Bernie supporters. Hillary supporters. Obama groupies. You name it, we’re here — united together.

Eight years ago, I never thought in a million years we would be here — two terms with the first Black president, and one step closer to have our first female president. It’s been an amazing journey, and today feels like an ultimate culmination point of the hard work this party has put in to make it as diverse and inclusive as possible. Stepping into the Pennsylvania Convention Center, you instantly know that this is the party of and for the people.

Kick-off started at 9 this morning. Not part of any delegation, I was still able to sit-in and listen to the Black caucus. This week there will be over 800 delegates in the Black caucus — the largest delegation at the DNC. From criminal justice reform to civic engagement. From changing demographics and the rising new american majority to featuring young, empowering Black women. From lighthearted jokes to intense and passionate prayer. This morning’s caucus meeting ignited all the senses; (re)filling both in the head and heart space of those in the room.

“This is a party with a purpose…[we are] on the front end of change.” said Senator Cory Booker, emphasizing that change does not come from Washington, D.C. Rather that change comes to Washington D.C. Everywhere I looked, individuals nodded their head in agreement, understanding the political power they hold.

It is no secret. We have seen how the African American population has helped determine the outcomes of several primary elections. This electorate — the new american majority — is far more ‘browner’ than the previous electorate. By uniting and mobilizing themselves, an important driving force for the Democratic Party can be unleashed in November.

For November, Rep. Barbara Lee said it best this morning, “Remember the legacy that we stand on.” That legacy she was referring to is the legacy of the greats that came before. Greats like Shirley Chisholm, Ron Brown, and Rev. Jesse Jackson Jr. It’s important to note that because of their work we’re able to have Barack Obama as our president. It’s also because of their work that we’re on our way to making Hillary Clinton our first female president this November.

So I leave you with that (for now – going to run to another caucus meeting). We all need to remember the legacy that we stand on. It is a legacy, if united together, that we can continue and pass on to the next generation. It is a legacy, if united together, that can move our country forward and highlight our diversity.

‘Til the next time.
– E